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Okmok Images



For the latest updates on this volcano, please visit the Alaska Volcano Observatory.


At 11:43 AM Saturday, July 12th, 2008, Okmok Caldera abruptly erupted, sending ash and pebbles into a cloud miles tall. Here are a few satellite images that the National Weather Service used to track the ash cloud in real time.



This is an infrared satellite of the Okmok Caldera eruption. Infrared satellite measures the temperature of the top of a cloud, with the blues and reds signifying the coldest tops. This image suggests that the ash cloud reached nearly 50,000 feet high!




This is a visible satellite image of the eruption. A visible satellite image depicts what would actually be seen if viewed from space. It is interesting to note that the intensity of this eruption literally opened a hole in the otherwise overcast skies, and later sent shockwaves of ripples through those clouds for over a hundred miles.




Photo Courtesy of the Federal Aviation Administration
This webcam image was taken at Dutch Harbor, approximately 60 miles away from Okmok Caldera. Note that during this period the skies turned a brownish color as some light ash fell.






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