National Oceanic Atmosphere Administration National Weather Service Headquarters National Weather Service Headquarters
NOAA logo WFO Anchorage Scalable transition graphic NWS logo
Transition from title bar to navgation bar   2002-2003 WINTER CLIMATE SUMMARY 07 AKDT 
blankspace Home   |   Mobile   |   Social Media   |   Mesonet   |   Surface Map   |   Radar   |   Submit Storm Reports   |   News =15 GMT 

LocalForecast by City, St or Zip Code

spacer

Forecasts/Products
  Public
  Forecast Discussion
    - With Glossary
  Aviation
  Marine
  Hydrology(RFC)
  Rivers & Lakes AHPS
  Ice Desk
  TV Weather
  Fire Weather
  Avalanche
  Travel 511
  Graphical
  xml logo RSS Feeds
  Marine FTPMail

spacer

Data
  Mesonet
  Model Graphics
  Local Model
  Observations
  Marine Obs
  Satellite/Radar
  Vent Factor
  Soaring Index
  Weather Links

spacer

Climate
  PAFC Climate
  Interactive Climate
  PAFC Records
  Local
  National
  More

spacer

Outreach
  About Us
  Community Outreach
  Kids' Page
  Tour/Speaker Request
  Weather Classroom
  Social Media

spacer

Reports
  COOP Observers
  Local Storm Reports
  Spotter Page
  Submit a Storm Report

spacer

Miscellaneous
  Archived Alaska Weather Stories
  Student Career Opportunities
  Research Papers

spacer

Print Friendly/
Low Bandwidth

  Public Forecasts
  Marine Forecasts

spacer

Contact Us
  mailto pafcweb

spacer

Facebook Follow the National Weather Service in Alaska on Twitter
USA.gov is the U.S. government's official web portal to all federal, state and local government web resources and services.


2002-2003 WINTER CLIMATE SUMMARY
National Weather Service, Anchorage

John Papineau, Ph.D 266-5165 john.papineau@noaa.gov

Due to persistent periods of high pressure located over western North America for much of the past winter, record warm air temperatures were established in many locations throughout Alaska. Much of this record warmth can be attributed to sea surface temperature anomalies in both the north and equatorial Pacific Ocean. The North Pacific experienced cooler than normal water temperatures which helped intensify and re-position the Aleutian low pressure system further to the east, when compared to normal. At the same time, sea surface temperatures in the Gulf of Alaska and along much of the west coast of North America were well above normal. The second contributing factor was the development of an El Nino in the equatorial Pacific during the Spring of 2002. El Nino's form when water temperatures in the eastern equatorial Pacific are 2-4o F above normal. The net result of an El Nino is to strengthen the upper level winds over the southern USA and in the process produce areas of persistent high pressure over western Canada.

As a result of a deeper than normal Aleutian low pressure system and high pressure over western Canada, warm air masses were consistently directed into Alaska from the North Pacific throughout the winter. Along with above normal temperatures, some regions were considerably wetter than normal as well: primarily the North Gulf Coast, Kenai Peninsula, and Kodiak.

During the second week of March, high pressure over British Colombia gave way to lower pressure while high pressure developed over the Bering Sea. This produced seasonal temperatures across the state during month of March.



Station Oct-Feb average Rank Nov-Mar average Rank
Annette 44.5o 1 42.7o 1
Yakutat 36.6o 3 33.8o 4
Cordova 38.3o 2 35.2o 2
Anchorage 30.8o 1 27.9o 2
Homer 36.8o 1 33.6o 1
Kodiak 38.8o 1 36.1o 2
King Salmon 33.1o 1 28.4o 2
Bethel 22.9o 1 18.7o 2
Nome 20.9o 2 15.5o 2
Fairbanks 12.5o 1 8.1o 1
Barrow +0.7o 1 -6.2o 1


National Weather Service
Anchorage Forecast Office
6930 Sand Lake Road
Anchorage, Ak 99502
(907) 266-5105 M-F/7-5pm
About Us
Career Opportunities
Glossary
Disclaimer
Privacy Policy
Credits
Alaska Weather Information Line:
1-800-472-0391